08/15/14 12:00pm

1Douglaston
18 Little Neck Road
Broker: Home-NY Corp.
Price: $1,300,000
Sunday, 2:00 – 4:00 pm
GMAP

2Long Island City
42-51 Hunter Street, #2D
Broker: SMS
Price: $1,100,000
Sunday, 2:30 – 3:30 pm
GMAP

1Middle Village
82-40 62nd Avenue
Broker: Corcoran
Price: $799,000
Sunday, 2:00 – 3:00 pm
GMAP

4Jackson Heights
25-45 85th Street
Broker: Realty Executives Today
Price: $630,000
Saturday, 2:00 – 4:00 pm
GMAP

08/01/14 2:00pm

woodhaven-demolition

Demolition is coming for six small businesses along Woodhaven Boulevard, making way for a residential build. One of those businesses is the Joe Abbracciamento Restaurant, which shuttered earlier this year. Other businesses include, according to Queens Chronicle, a family-owned dog grooming shop, Classic Designers salon, a balloon shop and a spa. The only biz still open is Community Physical Therapy, at 62-84 Woodhaven Boulevard.

The Criterion Group paid $9,000,000 for the entire block and will replace everything with a seven-story, 120-unit residential development. The DOB has not yet issued demolition permits, but a Criterion rep expects it to happen within the next two month. Construction on the development will last around two years.

Businesses Vacating Rego Park Block [Queens Chronicle]
All Joe Abbracciamento coverage [Q'Stoner] GMAP

Photo by Christopher Barca

07/23/14 3:00pm

juniper-valley-park-bocce-ball

This afternoon, Queens Parks Commissioner Dorothy Lewandowski, Borough President Melinda Katz, Council Member Elizabeth Crowley, and members of Queens Community Board 5 celebrated the opening of renovated, expanded bocce courts at Juniper Valley Park. The courts are located on the corner of Juniper Boulevard North and 79th Street, in Middle Village. There are now three courts, one of which was created new as part of the renovation. For the existing courts, the Parks Department repaired and resurfaced to improve play and comfort. They added new shade canopies made from recycled material at the ends of each court. There’s also a new sitting area between the courts, more comfortable benches, new fencing and additional trees and greenery. The renovation was funded with $800,000 allocated by the Borough President and $50,000 allocated by Council Member Crowley.

At the ribbon cutting ceremony, Commissioner Lewandowski accepted a set of bocce balls donated to the court in memory of a bocce player who raised his family near Juniper Valley Park.

Photo via Twitter

06/25/14 11:00am

Juniper Valley Park, nycgovparks.org 3

It’s officially summer now, a time when an afternoon in the park is just the thing to cool off body and soul. Because of history and geography, Queens can rightly boast of having some of the most unique parkland in the city, with parks ranging from the concrete and steel of Gantry Plaza State Park to the wide open sand dunes of Fort Tilden. While most of our city’s parks can boast of meadows and trees, Queen’s Juniper Valley Park, in Middle Village, is probably the only one that can boast of having a peat bog.

The park started out as a swamp. Tens of thousands of years ago, the glacier that created Long Island left behind a lot of water that collected in a swamp here. Much of that swamp eventually became a peat bog, as tons of vegetable material rotted and decomposed in the water and was turned into peat. Scientists in 1934 figured that the peat bog measured 10 acres in area, 16 feet in depth, and 390,000 cubic yards in volume.

The bog was called Juniper Swamp, due to the thick forest in and around the swamp filled with juniper and white cedar trees. During the Revolutionary War, the British occupying army camped out in the Middle Village area. Over the course of the war they decimated the forests in the area, cutting down trees for shelters, firewood and shipbuilding. They discovered the peat bog, and began cutting peat for fuel as well, a task also taken up by local residents, as the British had left little wood for anyone else. (more…)

06/09/14 1:00pm

At Central Park

Summer is about to be in full swing… and it’s time for youngsters to work on their swings — and jumps, sprints and putts. On July 1st, the City Parks Foundation kicks off its free 2014 Summer Sports Program in 12 green spaces in Queens. CityParks Tennis provides free tennis lessons to children, ages six to 16, and concludes with tournaments at the Central Park Tennis Center and Flushing Meadows Tennis Center in mid-August. CityParks Golf provides free lessons and equipment to boys and girls, ages six to 16. CityParks Track & Field gives kids, ages five to 16, the chance to learn the basics of the sport, from hurdles and relay races, to long jump, shot put and javelin throw. Participants then have the opportunity to compete in an organized meet at Icahn Stadium on Randall’s Island. The Queens schedule follows.

CityParks Tennis presented by Chase

  • Astoria Park, Astoria South and 18th Street, Tuesday and Thursday, 9 am to noon;
  • Alley Pond Tennis Center, Union Turnpike, Grand Central Parkway and Winchester Boulevard, Tuesday and Thursday, 9 am to noon;
  • Baisley Park, 155th Street and 118th Avenue, Tuesday and Thursday, 1 pm to 4 pm;
  • Brookville Park, Brookville Boulevard and Southern Parkway, Monday and Wednesday, 1 pm to 4 pm;
  • Cunningham Park, Union Turnpike and 193rd Street, Monday and Wednesday, 9 am to noon, and Tuesday and Thursday, 9 am to noon (Intermediate);
  • Forest Park, Myrtle Avenue and Woodhaven Boulevard, Monday and Wednesday, 1 pm to 4 pm;
  • Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Monday and Wednesday, 9 am to noon;
  • Flushing Memorial Field, 149th Street and 25th Avenue, Tuesday and Thursday, 1 pm to 4 pm;
  • Juniper Valley Park, 62nd Avenue and 80th Street, Monday and Wednesday, 9 am to noon, and Tuesday and Thursday, 9 am to noon (Intermediate); and
  • Kissena Park, Rose and Oak avenues, Tuesday and Thursday, 1 pm to 4 pm.

CityParks Golf presented by René Lacoste Foundation

  • Mario Fajardo Park Field 10, Kissena Boulevard and Booth Memorial Avenue, Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 am to 10:30 am (6-8 years), and 10:30 am to noon (9-16 years);
  • Alley Pond Park Field 1, Winchester Boulevard and Union Turnpike, Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 am to 10:30 am (6-8 years), and 10:30 am to noon (9-16 years);
  • Baisley Pond Park, Foch Boulevard and 155th Street, Tuesday and Thursday, 9:30 am to 10:30 am (6-8 years), and 10:30 am -to noon (9-16 years); and
  • Flushing Meadows Corona Park Field 11, 56th and Corona avenues, Tuesday and Thursday, 9:30 am to 10:30 am (6-8 years), and 10:30 am to noon.

CityParks Track & Field presented by EmblemHealth

  • Astoria Park, Astoria South and 18th Street, Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 am to 10:30 am (5-7 years), and 10:30 am to noon (8-16 years);
  • Juniper Valley Park, Juniper Boulevard and 71st Street, Tuesday and Thursday, 9:30 am to 10:30 am (5-7 years), and 10:30 am to noon (8-16 years);
  • Forest Park, Myrtle Avenue and Woodhaven Boulevard, Monday and Wednesday, 9:30 am – 10:30 am (5-7 years), and 10:30 am to noon (8-16 years); and
  • Detective Keith L. Williams Park, 173rd Street and 105th Avenue, Tuesday and Thursday, 9:30 am – 10:30 am (5-7 years) and 10:30 am to noon (8-16 years).

(more…)

06/06/14 4:00pm

queens-organics-collection

This month the NYC Department of Sanitation kicked off its curbside organics collection in the neighborhoods of Glendale, Middle Village and Maspeth. (The city announced the program would come to these neighborhoods early this year.) The date of the first collection in Glendale was Monday June, 2nd; the first collection in Middle Village and Maspeth will be Monday, June 16th. Collection will happen once a week on recycling day. This is a voluntary program where residents put out organic material like food waste, food-soiled paper, and leaf and yard waste, and it’s a city effort to reduce trash disposal costs and create renewable energy or compost. For more information, or to apply to participate, go here. The organics collection program already exists in areas of Manhattan, Staten Island, the Bronx and Brooklyn.

DSNY to Offer Curbside Collection of Food Scraps, Yard Waste and Soiled Paper [NYC.gov]
Closing Bell: Curbside Organics Collection Coming to Glendale, Middle Village, Maspeth [Q'Stoner]

05/30/14 12:00pm

1Sunnyside
48-43 38th Street
Broker: Douglas Elliman
Price: $799,000
Sunday, 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
GMAP

2Flushing
172-10 45th Avenue
Broker: Exit Realty Team
Price: $648,000
Sunday, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
GMAP

3Middle Village
62-69 81st Street
Broker: Tscherne Realty
Price: $648,000
Saturday, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
GMAP

4Jackson Heights
35-54 80th Street, #31
Broker: Douglas Elliman
Price: $625,000
Sunday, 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm
GMAP

05/23/14 12:00pm

fmFresh Meadows
73-62 188th Street
Broker: Laffey Fine Homes
Price: $1,199,888
Saturday, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
GMAP

mvMiddle Village
64-65 82nd Street
Broker: Coldwell Bankers
Price: $779,000
Sunday, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
GMAP

kgKew Gardens
83-80 118th Street
Broker: Exit Kingdom
Price: $239,000
Sunday, 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
GMAP

Screen Shot 2014-05-22 at 1.41.30 PMJackson Heights
34-40 79th Street
Broker: Halstead
Price: $219,000
Sunday, 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
GMAP

05/13/14 11:00am

Queens is the biggest borough, and has some of New York City’s longest streets. And like everything else, those streets are the result of evolution. Let’s take a look today at two of the borough’s longest routes and review their origins, while taking a look at their humble beginnings, or endings, depending on your point of view.

roosevelt

Roosevelt Avenue

Seen here is Roosevelt Avenue’s eastern end, where it meets Northern Boulevard at 155th Street in Flushing. Here is a soon-to-be defunct McDonalds, an IHOP restaurant, a branch of the Queens Public Library, a shopping center, and flags aplenty. Roosevelt Avenue, named for President Theodore, is relatively new on the Queens map; it’s soon to celebrate its centennial. It is a product of the Flushing elevated train, since when the line was constructed between 1914 and 1928, it required a right of way. It was decided to cut a street through that followed the unofficial border of Elmhurst and Jackson Heights, and then through the heart of Corona, and build the el along that route. Roosevelt Avenue serves as a de facto eastern extension of Greenpoint Avenue beginning at Queens Boulevard.

Initially Roosevelt Avenue ran only as far as what is now Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, as the el was not extended east of Willets Point Boulevard until it was completed as a subway out to Main Street in 1928. That year began downtown Flushing’s transformation as a quiet seat of a sleepy Queens town into the crossroads of Queens it has become today. In 1928 a preexisting east-west street running through Flushing, Amity Street, was widened and then extended through to a junction with Northern Boulevard, giving rise to the Roosevelt Avenue known today.

From the point shown in the photograph, it’s possible to bike, walk or drive all the way west to the East River in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

metroave1

Metropolitan Avenue

This major east-west route from Williamsburg to the edge of Jamaica is seen from its eastern end at the junction of Jamaica Avenue and Kew Gardens Road, another ancient route in itself (it was called Newtown Road decades ago and ran to what became Kew Gardens in the east end of the former town of Newtown). Here you find the relatively new Kew Gardens subway stop serving the E train, open only since 1988.

Metropolitan Avenue was opened in 1815, give or take a couple of years, as the Williamsburgh and Jamaica Turnpike and was once a toll road with toll gates and a “pike” or a lengthy log that would be move  aside when the toll was paid. It was mainly a farm to market road used by eastern farmers bringing their produce to New York City via East River shipping. In future decades Williamsburg would lose the “h” and the W&J would lose the toll, and was renamed Metropolitan Avenue. Oddly, this busy route has never gained extra lanes and the considerable widening comparable roads like Northern Boulevard and Queens Boulevard have, and remains a four-lane road throughout its length.

The neighborhood of Middle Village was named because it’s approximately halfway between Williamsburg and Jamaica, the two towns the road was built to service.

04/18/14 2:00pm

62-96 Woodhaven Blvd

The building at 62-96 Woodhaven Boulevard, the former home of Joe Abbracciamento Restaurant, is coming down — at least partly. Queens Chronicle reports that the developers filed demolition permits for a portion of the existing building to make way for a seven-story, 114-unit apartment building. No one is spilling any details on the coming demolition, and existing shop owners feel frustrated due to the lack of specifics on the future transfer of ownership and potential demo. The owners of A Dog’s Best Friend, located just down from Joe Abbracciamento Restaurant, plan to move the business a few blocks away because of all the uncertainty.

Demolition on the Menu for Abbracciamento’s [Queens Chronicle]
All Joe Abbracciamento coverage [Q'Stoner] GMAP

Photo via Google Maps